Margaret Beaton’s blog

Posting guidelines

I hope the conversations that take place on my blog will be deep, constructive and thought provoking. To ensure the quality of any discussion, I will review all comments and may edit them for clarity, length and relevance. Comments that are overly promotional, mean-spirited or off-topic may be deleted. All postings become the property of Beaton Executive Coaching.

Fear of failure, Part 1

Margaret Beaton

Fear of failure is pervasive. It affects everyone to varying degrees and in different ways. While most of us recognise our fear, few of us understand just how limiting this fear can be, or what we can do to prevent and overcome its adverse effects. This post on fear of failure is in two parts. … [Read More]

 

Thank you for the feedback

Margaret Beaton

Thank you for the feedback is written to help you get a good deal more from the feedback you receive. It’s a well-known saying that bread is the staff of life. I say feedback is as important to psychological and social wellbeing, as good bread is to nutritional and physical health. To be useful, bread … [Read More]

 

Confirmation bias clouds our judgement

Margaret Beaton

Confirmation bias is the well-known tendency to selectively attend to information that will reinforce pre-existing beliefs or ideas while ignoring good evidence to the contrary. As Warren Buffet says ‘What the human being is best at doing is interpreting all new information so that their prior conclusions remain intact’. A synonym for confirmation bias is … [Read More]

 

Influence without authority

Margaret Beaton

A leader’s ability to influence without authority – in the traditional sense – is rapidly becoming a hallmark of the new era in the world of work. A client recently captured the challenge of having to influence others without authority when she said: “Can you teach me how to hold someone accountable who does not report to … [Read More]

 

Sequel to never good enough

Margaret Beaton

A year ago, my ‘Never good enough’ post struck a nerve with readers of this blog and my LinkedIn page. Many readers identified strongly with the dilemma of perfectionism: On the one hand striving for excellence, and on the other, falling prey to the perils of expecting yourself to be flawless all the time. Recently … [Read More]

 

Stay relevant

Margaret Beaton

To stay relevant as a successful leader you must develop on the job. You can never stop seeking stretch assignments and leveraging on-the-job opportunities to improve. What made you a successful leader in the past is no formula for your future success. And may even be detrimental, if pursued blindly. Research shows in today’s and … [Read More]

 

Use unconventional strategies to reinvent yourself

Margaret Beaton

The title of this post Use unconventional strategies to reinvent yourself, refers to the fact that more and more people are seeking major changes in their lives and careers, i.e. to reinvent themselves. Whether it’s at the stage of the so-called mid-life crisis or later, when the conventional age of ‘retirement’ arrives, the prospect of … [Read More]

 

Conflict and succession

Margaret Beaton

Relationships seldom evolve as planned or expected. Conflict and succession are fellow travellers. Whether the succession relationship is between two people, e.g. between incumbent and putative successor, or in a group like a family business, a professional partnership or an executive team, research and experience show that prevention is better than cure. The fundamental cause … [Read More]

 

Challenge your mental models

Margaret Beaton

Mental models determine your thought processes about how things work. They shape your behaviours: how you work, solve problems, relate to people and think about yourself. Mental models are ingrained, fixed structures founded in your beliefs, habits, scripts and biases. They tell you what’s worked for you in the past – and therefore what you should … [Read More]

 

The virtue of gratitude

Margaret Beaton

When was the last time you said thank you to a member of your staff, a service provider, or your partner? I mean truly said ‘thank you’ in the way you expressed your gratitude, even if the reason for saying ‘thank you’ was in response to a mundane act? Were your words perfunctory and robotic? … [Read More]